Is Failure OK?

Why Is A 90% Failure Rate Ok?

By Sharon Drew Morgen

We build a 90% failure rate into our sales results; it’s so endemic in our field that we prepare for it! We hire 10X more sales people to get the results we seek, we get 50% longer sales cycles than we could be having, and we face objections because people are responding to the sales model itself, we lose clients we shouldn’t lose. To make matters worse, we get often turned down because our process doesn’t manage many of the buyer’s decision issues – even when our solution would be a perfect fit.

What a waste – not only for sellers, but for buyers.

This doesn’t need to happen. Sales is just an incomplete model that we’ve accepted as the way to place our products. It is directed at the product decision end of the buying decision with no ability to guide buyers through their tangle of “stuff” they need to figure out — the people and policy issues, the old vendor issues, the relationship and political and interdepartmental issues — before they can make a buying decision. It’s where prospects go when they say, “I’ll call you back.” They have to get buy-in from everything that touches their Identified Problem. Sales doesn’t offer skills for this and buyers do this on their own and the time it takes them is the length of the sales cycle.

Unfortunately for them, buyers don’t initially know the route through all of their decisions, either. And we meet them far too early in their decision process, leaving us waiting to close and not knowing what’s going on.

So we wait. And 90% of the prospects don’t come back because their internal issues haven’t been resolved. And buyers can’t buy until they get buy-in — even if it means they don’t resolve their need.

Sales doesn’t offer us the tools to help guide them through the route to all of those decisions. It’s quite possible to recalibrate our jobs to be not only solution providers, but neutral navigators — Buying Facilitators if you will — much like a buddy to a sight-impaired friend who knows where they want to go but doesn’t know the exact route to get there. Or like a GPS system that can calibrate the route without driving the car or being involved with the wedding you are attending.

By focusing on the buying decision end of the equation, sales can be closed in months rather than years, weeks rather than months, and sellers can stop wasting so much of their time. And failing so often. Imagine if doctors or baseball players had the same failure rate!

Imagine if we could lead buyers through all of their unconscious decision criteria, help them discover who needs to buy in to a new solution, and help them build our product into their solution design. Imagine.

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All these men failed greatly, do you recognize their names?

People who found success despite failures

Colonel Sanders: The founder of KFC. He started his dream at 65 years old! He got a social security check for only $105 and was mad. Instead of complaining he did something about it.

He thought restaurant owners would love his fried chicken recipe, use it, sales would increase, and he’d get a percentage of it. He drove around the country knocking on doors, sleeping in his car, wearing his white suit.

Do you know how many times people said no till he got one yes? 1009 times!

Walt Disney: The man who gave us Disney World and Mickey Mouse. His first animation company went banktrupt. He was fired by a news editor cause he lacked imagination. Legend has it he was turned down 302 times before he got financing for creating Disney World.

Albert Eistein: He didn’t speak till he was four and didn’t read till seven. His parents and teachers thought he was mentally handicapped. He only turned out to win a Nobel prize and be the face of modern physics.

Richard Branson: He’s a billionaire mogul of Virgin but has had his share of failures. Remember Virgin Cola or Virgin credit cards? Probably not. He’s lost hundreds of millions of dollars but has not let failure stop him. When you’re rich like him you can rent his private island for $53,000 a night.

Mark Cuban: The billionaire owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks got rich when he sold his company to Yahoo for $5.9 billion in stock. He admitted he was terrible at his early jobs. His parents wanted him to have a normal job. So he tried carpentry but hated it. He was a short order cook but a terrible one. He waited tables but couldn’t open a bottle of wine. He says of his failures,

“I’ve learned that it doesn’t matter how many times you failed,” Cuban says. “You only have to be right once. I tried to sell powdered milk. I was an idiot lots of times, and I learned from them all.”

Vincent Van Gogh: He only sold one painting in his lifetime!  Just one to a friend. Despite that he kept painting and finished over 800 pieces. Now everyone wants to buy them and his most expensive painting is valued at $142.7 million.

Theodor Seuss Giesel: Dr. Seuss gave us Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham. Books every child reads. At first many didn’t think he would succeed. 27 different publishers rejected Dr. Seuss’s first book To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.

John Grisham: The American author first was a lawyer who loved to write. His first book A Time to Kill took three years to write. The book was rejected 28 times until he got one yes for a 5,000 copy print. He’s sold over 250 million total copies of his books.

Steven Spielberg: He applied and was denied two times to the prestigious University of Southern California film school. Instead he went to Cal State University in Long Beach.

He went on to direct some of the biggest movie blockbusters in history. Now he’s worth $2.7 billion and in 1994 got an honorary degree from the film school that rejected him twice.

Stephen King: His first book Carrie was rejected 30 times and he threw it in the trash. His wife retrieved it out of the trash and encouraged him to resubmit it. The rest is history. He has sold more than 350 million copies of his books. (He’s also made many adults fear clowns too.)

Stephenie Meyer: The author of the crazy Twilight series said the inspiration from the book came from a dream. She finished it in three months but never intended to publish it until a friend suggested she should.

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How are you going reach your financial goals?

Visit my Lightyear Wireless website: http://bc.deck.lightyearwireless.com

Today the Cross is draped in black but

it will not stay that way!!!

Happy Easter!

Join Some of us for “SONRISE SERVICE” SUNDAY!

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About lywirelessrepnc

Just a country boy trying to help (those who want to pay their college tuition or student loans) by sharing how to get unlimited wireless service with the bonus of free service and cash flow. I will help all my associates be better marketing and social media users.
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